Ohh…Ahh…Yes! Yes!

So I’ve been at my new job at a fitness/bariatric center for a few months now.  I’m starting to get into a groove there, getting comfortable in my new position…all the things that go along with starting a new job. 

Although…I’m getting used to an aspect of the job that isn’t a “common” issue when starting a new position.

I can’t sugar coat this so I’m just going to come out and say it…

People make sex noises when they work out.

Not just little grunts and puffs, but full blown, loud, heavy breathing, groaning, yelling out…with the inevitable final yell out at the finish.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not judging them in the least!  Good for them for working so hard and pushing themselves so hard to get fit!  But now I’m a little paranoid when I exercise that I may be making the same noises!  Not that anyone in the gym would think anything about it as it’s a normal part of the environment, but now I really think about it during my workouts.  This, in turn, has changed a possible grunt I need to get out while I’m in the middle of my “100” in Pilates into a laugh instead.  This not only makes me look a little crazy, but seems to be confusing my Pilates instructor.

I got to thinking about this more this week and my feelings on the subject?  Screw it (no pun intended)… Let it out!  If that is a part of getting healthy (or in our case, managing Fibromyalgia) then yell, moan, grunt, huff and puff…and get that exercise in!

It is estimated that 80 percent of people with Fibromyalgia are physically unfit, and I’m sure we’ve all been told that exercise can help improve our symptoms.  It’s hard for us, there’s no doubt in that…however… the noises I hear every day at work are the best evidence that it’s hard for everyone else too, in one way or another. 

Before Zumba, I was one of those people who was majorly intimidated by the Gym.  I was afraid it would be a bunch of beautiful, muscular people who were going to judge me for my inability to do a perfect squat.  There are people of all shapes, sizes, and reasons for being there.  Maybe the person is trying to lose a few pounds, or GAIN a few pounds, or get flexibility back after an injury, maybe they just had a baby, maybe they just wanted to get away from their kids for an hour, or maybe they’re fighting through a chronic pain condition like us!  Knowing what I know now I could kick myself for that fear.  Not everyone at the gym is a body builder or a model.  And here’s another secret let out of the bag…working out is not a “beautiful” process for any one.  Faces turn red, sweat flows, people cuss, people fart, and yes…they make sex noises.

I fully believe exercise has saved me from being completely swallowed by fibro pain.  I will always support it as important treatment for fibro patients.  If you want to try an exercise program, please don’t let the gym intimidation be a reason not to start.  If it takes a few moans and groans to feel even a little less fibro pain, then I say let them out!

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What I’ve learned this week…

I started my new job this week.  So far so good!  I crammed enough learning into five days to send my fibro fog into overdrive.  By yesterday, my husband I went grocery shopping and I caught myself talking backwards.  Hey, at least I saved that for the people at Wal-Mart (along with a very confused hubby) and not the clients at the gym.  I can hear myself now “Are signed up you today Pilates?” 

Going from a nursing home to a gym is quite a switch and I’ve learned a few new things this week:

-People LOVE their early morning workouts.  At 6 a.m. on the dot, clients come in ready to work.  These people are my hero’s.  I am NOT an early morning exerciser.  I think a lot of it is because my fibro handles night work-outs much better, but truth be told, I’m not very pleasant in the morning.  I’m probably putting that lightly.

-While my Zumba® Gold chair classes are starting off slow, I had one of the best experiences while teaching this type of class this week.  I cooled down to “Feeling Good” by Michael Buble’.  http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oG7iWDSV9QNFkANxJXNyoA/SIG=120somkru/EXP=1348450819/**http%3a//www.youtube.com/watch%3fv=Edwsf-8F3sI  You have to click this link to this song to truly appreciate the “sultry” mood of the music. An adorable woman who attended my class LOVES this song and started singing along.  Before I know it, she’s yelling “Take it off, Take it off!”  It was a good thing this song was my cool down because I was laughing so hard I probably couldn’t have composed myself for any other songs!  Experiences like these are why I LOVE teaching Zumba®!

– People make very interesting noises while they’re working out.  Nuff said.

– I lost 3 ½ pounds this week alone!  Crazy what happens when you don’t sit behind a desk for over 8 hours a day.

– Starting a new job the same week the weather switches from 70 to 39 degrees was ridiculous!  I had fully prepared myself for a “stress from starting a new job, new schedule, oh my God…CHANGE” flare, but I was unpleasantly surprised by a “new weather” flare.  Here comes fall!

– My bosses are Filipino.  I need language lessons.  Can you imagine Fibro-fog mixed with a brand new language!  I have enough trouble with English most days!

– Our gym has partnered with the bariatric center who helped me with my diet during my weight loss.  A much needed “follow my healthy diet” has happened this week.  And if anyone out there has followed a high-protein diet, you feel my pain here.  My increase of protein has also come with an increase of gas.  Aren’t I sexy??  This partnership let me in on one a client’s start of her weight loss journey.  She lost 7 ½ pounds her first week starting with the diet and exercise program.  Seeing her do this was really amazing!

– This change has been good for my mindset.  It was time and I’m happy to make some changes in my life!

We’ll see what next week brings!

Guilty as Charged…

Thank you Health.com for this article…

So…

What mistakes are you guilty of?

“13 Mistakes Fibromyalgia Patients Make.”   http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20389399_10,00.html

1-Not tracking your pain.

I am guilty as charged with this one.   I understand the thought process behind it.  Track your pain, see the connections in the time of day, weather, etc.   Did I do something that day that made it feel better?  Etc.

To be honest there are two reasons I don’t track my pain.

First…my pain is totally random.  I get the usual “rainy day” pains and “stress” pains, but then I also get the days like today:  75 degrees, sunny, beautiful, and I want to rip my neck off. 

Second…I just plain don’t want to think about it when I don’t have to.  If I’m having a pain free day then I’m not going bring up the subject of pain in any way, shape or form.  I’m always afraid I’ll curse myself by saying it out loud.

2- Expecting too much from medication.

Since I’ve tried the “fibro” drugs with no luck, I’m not guilty of this one, but I bet a lot of fibro patients are…and thanks to some misleading television commercials…so is the public. 

3- Refusing to consider off-label drugs.

Guilty again.  The example they use here is using an anti-depressant to treat fibromyalgia.  I refuse to take an anti-depressant and will forever refuse an anti-depressant. I gladly take pain over the way these drugs change my mental state.  Convincing doctors of this is a whole separate battle.

4- Not exploring alternatives.

Yoga, meditation, Tai Chi, Pilates, etc.  I am not guilty of this one, but it’s a sore subject for me.  Because I am an active person with fibro, I get a lot of negative comments, disbelief, and arguments on whether fibro patients can or cannot exercise regularly.   

“You can’t possibly have fibro and do cardio.” 

“Give it time, eventually you’ll be so depressed from fibro you won’t want to do those things anymore .” (Gee…thanks for the uplifting words!)

“Your fibro must not be as bad as mine because you exercise.”  Did the people (yes multiple) who said this to me ever stop to think….maybe my fibro isn’t as bad as yours BECAUSE I exercise.  I can’t make you try, but I hope by continuing to do what I do and showing that I’m, in fact, still alive the next day will, at the very least, inspire someone to try. 

5-Sticking with the wrong Doctor.

This is one of the main questions I get on this blog and through facebook messages. “Should I switch Doctors.”  I’m never quite sure how to answer this question, but I can say I went through MULTIPLE doctors (both family and Rheumatologist) before found the ones I have now.  I usually ask the person who asks me this question, “Are you getting what you want from your doctor in regards to how you want to treat your fibro?”  For example:  I don’t take pain meds.  My current rheumatologist was the only one I’ve had who was willing to use alternative treatments (like physical therapy) and not push meds on me. 

6- Denying that you’re sick.

They describe this as refusing to believe you actually have fibromyalgia.  I’m not sure I am, or ever was, guilty of directly refusing I have fibro, but I have definitely been guilty of refusing to believe some of the symptoms I’ve had that were related to it.

7- Not enlisting family support.

Guilty. Guilty. Guilty.  Just ask my husband…it took me a long time to accept his help. 

8-Not reaching out to others.

This, sadly, can backfire in a lot of ways.  I have been lucky to have very understanding friends, but the subject can really scare some people away too.  It’s understandable…no one really knows what to say.  Although this article uses this as more of a “find a friend to lean on” example, I would also say that this example could also be used as a warning that fibro can lead to you wanting to isolate yourself from your friends and the word…don’t let it!  My friends have distracted me with laughter from SO many flares!

9- Not talking about it.

Not guilty here.  Please everyone!  Please don’t be afraid to talk about it.  Understanding won’t come without this!

10-Feeling guilty.

Guilty…of feeling guilty.  I feel guilty when I have to rely on my husband more than I’d like too.  When I miss out on a party or gathering because I feel like poo.  When I’m tired and snappy…the list could go on and on.

11- Letting Fibromyalgia get to you.

Guilty and I know someone with fibro would be lying if they said this never happened to them. 

12- Taking life too seriously.

*Sigh* Guilty again.  When you spend most of your days in “survival mode” it’s hard not get caught up in seriousness of the day.  Survive the pain…Survive the fog…Survive without falling asleep…Survive another headache, etc.  Zumba saves me from this.  It’s one hour to act as crazy as I want and not think of anything important.

13- Not moving because it hurts too much.

See my response to #4.

Hmmm…according to this I’m making a lot of mistakes.  How about you?

My Fibro Awareness Challenge to You..

Thank you so much to everyone who watched and “liked” my video for the fibromyalgia awareness day 2012 contest.  I have been totally humbled by how many people have watched the video, and how many wonderful comments I have received.  Even if I don’t win the contest, I am so happy I made the video.

I have made a lot of new contacts through the contest through facebook, email, and my blog.  I have been able to see how much people are promoting fibro awareness.  Last year I didn’t get to see all the comments and purple splashed everywhere…it’s great!

After the past few weeks, however, I have my own fibro awareness challenge for this year’s fibro awareness day.  We fibro fighters seem to be doing a great job at letting the general public (friends, family, co-workers, etc.) know what fibro entails and we also seem to be supporting each other through chat groups and support groups.  But…are we pushing awareness to our healthcare providers. 

About a week ago I started to not be able to catch a full breath.  I’ve had the continuous need to yawn and it’s taking multiple tries to catch a good, full breath.   I got on some support groups for fibromyalgia and found out this is a very common problem.  Patient after patient told stories of having the same issue…and also having the same problem…their doctors weren’t sure WHY they were having this issue.  It was suggested to me to try increasing my iron, as this is a common problem with anemia.  Iron increased (along with constipation from the iron), but after three days of Iron supplements, I was still not breathing.  I called my Rheumy and he stated he didn’t think this was a common problem with fibro patients.  The support groups beg to differ.  Is this really not common, or are the patients not making their doctors aware of this problem? 

I taught my weekly Zumba class and it felt horrible.  I was dizzy, winded and really frustrated.  For anyone that loves Zumba, I’m sure they would have the same reaction I did…”Oh my God, what if I have a serious problem and won’t be able to Zumba anymore!”  Zumba is my therapy…both physical and mental….I couldn’t stand the thought of not doing it anymore!  I decided to take off the rest of the semester (I teach at a University) from teaching to figure this thing out.  I attended a Zumba class Thursday night and it actually felt pretty good.  I could not figure out why I could survive a class like this (the instructors are very high energy), but when I sat at my desk at work I was yawning and having shallow breathing.

Friday I went to my doctor and he treated me for a possible respiratory infection and possible pleurisy.  Two days later, the antibiotics weren’t making a different and I got really dizzy trying to get our grocery shopping done.  So Sunday evening I called my doctor’s after hours line and he stated I needed a chest X-ray, so off to the E.R. we went. 

After blood work, an EKG, Chest X-ray and monitoring my Oxygen, my heart and lungs checked out perfectly healthy.  My mental state, however, not so much.  My body is apparently in a high anxiety state and it’s causing me to hyperventilate consistently. 

This doctor I had in the E.R was definitely not aware of fibro.  Actually he’s an ass and the doctor I had when I miscarried my baby.  He handled that situation AND this situation very poorly to put it nicely.  To put it not so nicely, the man needs punched in the teeth. 

He had multiple suggestions to lower my stress. 

1.  Drugs.  “I have to find an anti-depressant that works for me.”  I have had no luck with anti-depressants.  I have had my experiences with them and they have all been negative.  Doctors don‘t seem to understand, but THERE ARE people who cannot take these.  For me, I get the opposite intended effect of the drug.  I get REALLY overly happy for a few weeks and then get so down it get scary.  Dangerously sad.  I have tried probably 7 or 8 types of antidepressants and have had the same problem with all of them.  I can’t take them and don’t intend to take them in the future.  Only I know my body, and my body is saying no.

2. Quit my job.  SURE…let me jump right on that one.  Screw my bills and responsibility, I don’t need a job.  Puuullleeaasee…unless he’s planning on picking up my bills I’m not quitting, plus I don’t think my job is the cause of my stress.  My husband and I recently had a rough few months due to him losing his job.  He’s since found a better one (yay!), but the past three months have been rough.  I think losing a job is tough on everybody, but for someone with fibro, I think it’s even more of a challenge.  I know Doctor’s know anxiety is a symptom of fibromyalgia, but are they aware of why, or how different anxiety may feel for a fibro patient? 

3.  Walk two miles every day.  Um…ok.  I filled the doctor in on how active I am already and he said what I’m already doing doesn’t matter.  This is where I couldn’t get him to understand the fibro.  I am already pushing my activity level, do I really need more?  Plus, as funny as it sounds, I can easily handle an hour of two of Zumba, but my hips and lower back have a hard time handling continuous walking.  It’s a different muscle movement, and Zumba can always be modified if my hips are sore.  He didn’t get this and swore the answer to all of my stress was EXACTLY two miles of walking a day.  Again…Ass.

After getting really pissed at this man, I realized it wasn’t worth it.  I went to the E.R. with a purpose…to make sure my lungs and heart were not the cause of my breathing issues and that’s what I got.  I have to brush this doctor off for being very uniformed.

I really wonder, however, if doctors are really aware of how fibro patients handle stress and anxiety.  Yes, there is a bit of depression involved, but I’m sure there are a lot of people out there like me who don’t consider themselves “depressed” but just physically unable to handle some stresses.  I think my body got tired from keeping itself going during me and my husband’s rough patch and it just now caught up with me.  A Fibro patient’s body is already fatigued, so to me anyway, the fact that we handle anxiety differently makes perfect sense.  We’re tired, we hurt, we don’t sleep…we’re not crazy…our bodies just work differently. 

I have taken the day off work to hopefully start catching my breath and I’m going to start looking into meditation or breathing exercises.  While I wasn’t up for it this morning (not until my dizziness subsides) I know Pilates will be a big help to regulate my breathing.  I’m also glad I know I’m healthy and able to get my Zumba therapy…that is a huge relief.  I know, in time, this too shall pass.  I’m re-learning how my body and mind work since getting fibro, and this, like every other side effect coming my way, I seem to have to learn the hard way. 

But I still wonder how much our doctors really know about the side effects and symptoms we share with each other, but may not be sharing with them.  As annoyed as they may get, my fibro awareness challenge is to let your doctors know of a side effect you’re having beyond pain.  Do they know how bad anxiety can get?  My rheumy wasn’t aware of this problem, but if a new patient comes to him with the same issue, he is now aware I had the same problem.  Will this lead to helping the next person?  It’s worth a shot in my mind.  Are the topics we share in our support groups getting shared with our doctors?  I hope they are.  I think we can get so bogged down with making sure our doctors are properly treating our “pain” that we can forget (or fog away) the other annoyances fibro can bring…like anxiety, skin problems, allergies, etc.  Fibro is WAY more than just pain and should be treated that way, but they can’t treat it if they don’t know.

My Fibromyalgia awareness challenge for you…tell your doctor a symptom you’re having that he may not even know about.  Who knows how this will change their understanding of this condition for us and future fibro patients.

Fibro Christmas Carol…

I hope everyone has a great and pain-free Christmas this year! 

To all my fellow fibro-warriors out there, here is my own personal fibro Christmas Carol…

On the first day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

A session with my P.T.

On the second day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the third day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Three purple ribbons. 

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the Fourth day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the fifth day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the sixth day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!?

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the seventh day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Seven swans in Pilates.

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the eight day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Eight sleepless nights.

Seven swans in Pilates.

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the ninth day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Nine Zumba ladies dancing.

Eight sleepless nights.

Seven swans in Pilates.

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the 10th day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Ten achy fingers.

Nine Zumba ladies dancing.

Eight sleepless nights.

Seven swans in Pilates.

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the eleventh day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Eleven gluten free cookies.

Ten achy fingers.

Nine Zumba ladies dancing.

Eight sleepless nights.

Seven swans in Pilates.

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs.

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

And a session with my P.T.

On the twelfth day of Christmas, Fibro gave to me…

Twelve neck pains.

Eleven gluten free cookies.

Ten achy fingers.

Nine Zumba ladies dancing.

Eight sleepless nights.

Seven swans in Pilates.

Six Yoga child poses.

WHERE’S THE BIO-FREEZE!?!? 

Four Fibro Fogs

Three purple ribbons.

Two heating pads.

AND A SESSION WITH MY P.T.

One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain. – Bob Marley

I’ve had the opportunity recently to connect with other Zumba instructors from all over the world who also suffer from Fibromyalgia or other chronic pain problems.  It’s been great to be able to chat with people who fully understand what I go through every day.  Learning to teach Zumba is a challenge in itself, but learning to teach with fibromyalgia has been a whole other adventure.  I know my Zumba experience is probably different from a person who does not suffer chronic pain, but I can only speak from my perspective and let’s face it, I’m still a newbie when it comes to teaching.  So, I called out to these fellow instructors and got some added insight on how our Zumba experience is different as we fight against chronic pain. 

I asked the question “What is your biggest challenge teaching Zumba with Fibromyalgia or other chronic pain problems.”

Chronic pain stereotypes would lead you to believe that this question is easily answered and that pain MUST be the biggest challenge.  This actually doesn’t seem to be the case at all.  In fact, I was so happy to see that this little group of chronic pain fighters are some of the most positive thinkers I have met in a long time.  For every “challenge” there seemed to be a solution, and not one of these “challenges” has stopped anyone from doing what they love to do. 

The following answers were given…plus my little insight on them…of course:

–          Added pain with changing weather.  (AMEN SISTER!!  Southern Indiana just got its first “real” snow yesterday and it damn near killed me.  It didn’t stop me from going to Zumba…also didn’t stop me from cussing out the sleet and snowflakes on my slick drive home). 

–          Stiffness in the mornings.  (A friend of mine recently planned on going to a Zumba class that started at 5:15 a.m.  HUH???  We did a Thanksgiving Zumba recently that started at 8:30 and I was so stiff my arms felt like stone.  Even when I was helping with an 11:00 a.m. class I had to make sure I got up early enough to get some of my morning stiffness out).

–          Fibro-Fog and forgetting steps.  (The instructor who posted this response said she gets through this with laughter and I agree.  I love what she said so I have to quote her “A class with laughter is a great alternative therapy.”)

–          Fatigue, being un-motivated or wanting to skip class.  (I know these days.  I’m having one right now.  Awful, grumpy, bloodshot eyed, head bobbing, just want to cry…exhaustion.  This is one aspect of fibro I don’t understand.  It’s usually on days like today that I feel SO tired all day and five minutes into Zumba I’m jumping off the walls with energy.  There seemed to be a general consensus on this topic that once the motivation or push came, we all felt much better after class).

–          “Just glad I made it through.” (I love that having a chronic pain problem has not stopped these instructors from teaching tough class.  My mentors for Zumba teach some high intensity songs and I want to be able to do the same…and I’ll be damned if Fibro is going to keep me from that!)

–          Having to pretend I don’t hurt when I do.  (This one is hard and I failed miserably at it last night as I left class early with back pain.  Instructors keep smiling, keep cuing, and keep the class motivated, while also trying to keep that high energy flowing through a whole class.  We, chronic pain sufferers, are doing the same thing but brushing off pain at the same time. This isn’t always the easiest thing to do.  I get an attitude about this sometimes when I’m having a bad fibro day.  For example, during a song full of squats when people are moaning and groaning I want to turn around and yell “Oh yeah!  You think it hurts YOU, you should try it with Fibro!”—Not that I would ever do this, but those thoughts do go through my head.)

–          There are advantages we may have over other instructors.  Because we are aware of our bodies and body pain, we may have an easier time modifying moves for different levels of Zumba experience.  (This is not only comes in handy for students, but also for ourselves.   I love this train of thought.  It’s such a great way to use our so–called  “set-backs” to our advantage.)

–          The most important statement that was worded in many different ways is that not one of these instructors dwells on the pain.  They may have to change their ways of doing some things, but the pain does not seem to be stopping anyone. 

I have to remember this positive thinking.  Last night was a rough fibro and Zumba night for me. I know it’s going to happen every once in awhile, but it’s still hard (physically and mentally) when it does happen.  I also recently ended up in tears while searching YouTube.  Did I cry from watching bad Zumba choreography?   No, just kidding.  I cried as I watched fibromyalgia documentaries and personal videos.  Some people couldn’t walk without crutches, or walk at all.  Some people were so full of pain medication I couldn’t understand their video.  Some couldn’t get in or out of a car, get out of bed on their own, or take a bath without assistance.

It was heartbreaking.  Sometimes I get so busy with my Zumba/Pilates schedule that I forget how severe fibromyalgia can be.  It’s then that I realize how grateful I am FOR that crazy schedule and how it helps me manage my fibro.  I think the instructors I have mentioned are all extremely grateful or our crazy Zumba-filled lives.  You hear so many success stories of people losing weight from Zumba or finally sticking to an exercise program, etc. But there is also a group of chronic pain fighters who are thankful for those successes and so much more.  Thankful for the ability to move, to teach, to motivate, inspire, and enjoy life!

The “Yo” kicked my butt…

On Oct 31st I closed my eyes and took in a deep breath in anticipation for the month to come, knowing November was going to be crazy from beginning to end.  We’re officially Mid-way through the month…I don’t know if I’m going to make it.

Breakdown of the month so far:

-Work, Work, Work.

-Woke up and couldn’t hear.  Spent Monday and Tuesday with only one good ear.  Wednesday, a nice nurse at work fixed it.  Thank goodness!

-Zumba

– Lost a dear loved-one.  God has a very special Angel with him now.

-Pilates

– Work, Work, Work.

-Early Christmas shopping

-Zumba

-Birthday shopping for my Sis.

-Early work Christmas party (yes, in November).  Won “Outstanding Collections 2011” for my position and the building where I work won “Facility of the year.”  Yay!

– Started painting the wall mural in the new Zumba room at the gym for their open house next weekend.

– Party to watch the Pacquiao fight.  Ate enough Filipino egg rolls to meet my fried food quota for the rest of the year. 

-Paint

-Paint

-Paint

-DRANK ENERGY DRINKS!  GOT REALLY EXCITED ABOUT PAINTING!!!!

– Husband ends up with Stomach flu/bug.

– Work, Work, Work.

 

And of course in the mix of all the chaos…there is Fibro.  It has held up fairly well through the madness, but I do feel a physical therapy session in my future just to keep it in line.

I was able to find time this past Monday to try PiYo for the first time.  PiYo is a yoga and Pilates mix that involves core strengthening, stretching and flexibility.  I’ve been doing Pilates for almost a year in a half now, but had only done yoga at home on my own.  Let’s just say the “Yo” in PIYO kicked my butt.  The class is choreographed to music, which I loved.  When I asked the instructor about the class prior to going, she said it was like yoga or Pilates or people with A.D.D.  After doing the class, I would say that seems about right. 

“Squat, lunge, warrior pose, triangle pose, squat, warrior pose, triangle…”

I actually liked that it changed a lot.  I think it kept my attention because I was constantly anticipating what the next move or pose would be.  It’s going to take me a while to get used standing through a lot of the workout, since Pilates is generally laying and sitting down.  I plan to go to another class soon, but as far as my fibro goes, it still needs straight Pilates.  I find Pilates a little more peaceful.  I usually feel calm after Pilates.  After PiYo, I felt as pumped up as I do after a Zumba class. 

Now I’m going to say something and knock on wood at the same time….

I think it may be time to try to do all this fibro surviving without daily medication.  I’ve been slowly changing my dose on my nightly muscle relaxer.  I started with a whole pill once or twice a day, to once a day, then to half a pill.  Now I’ve been skipping days at a time, taking half of one about every three days.  Last night I took half a pill after a 4 day break and this morning was horrible.  I was dizzy, nauseous and overly-tired.  I felt hung-over.  I started feeling this way in the mornings before I had to switch a whole pill to half.  I think it may just be too much for me now.

I just want to see what happens if I take a break from the heavy duty pain relievers.  Yes I’ll probably still need something through a flare, and occasional physical therapy.  I know there will be days I’ll probably regret trying this, and the experiment might even fail, but with as bad as I felt this morning, I would rather just have some pain. 

Besides, how do we ever REALLY know if we need the pain meds we are on, unless we know what it’s like without them?  I’m giving it a try.  Wish me luck.

 

 

 

 

 

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